Brontë, Flash fiction, Juvenilia, Literature

Hidden Treasure: More Brontë Flash Fiction

Hidden Treasure Charlotte Brontë looked at the quill in her hand and felt irritable. Abandoning her writing and walking to the parsonage window, she reflected on her surroundings. Haworth’s cobbled streets and countryside had provided an excellent setting for her childhood adventures; the four surviving Brontë siblings had roamed the moors whenever the weather had… Continue reading Hidden Treasure: More Brontë Flash Fiction

Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Poetry, Reviews

30 of the Best Books About the Brontës: Revised

A couple of years ago I penned what has turned out to be one of my most popular posts ever. I listed 30 books about the Brontës which have been particularly useful or enlightening during my research on the family over the years. To qualify the books simply had to be entirely about the Brontës… Continue reading 30 of the Best Books About the Brontës: Revised

Brontë, Literature, Reviews

The Mist on Brontë Moor by Aviva Orr

The Mist on Brontë Moor is a 2013 novel by Aviva Orr which I accidentally stumbled across whilst browsing through some new titles to put on my Kindle for my holiday back in September. Although I didn't manage to squeeze it in between the lovely Greek sun, the pool, the food, and the Poirot book I had… Continue reading The Mist on Brontë Moor by Aviva Orr

Brontë, Literature, photography

My Journey with Anne Brontë in Scarborough, Part 1: St. Mary’s Church and the Woodend Exhibition

If there is a place synonymous with the Brontë family, it is, of course, the village of Haworth in West Yorkshire. Haworth was the home of the family from 1821 when Patrick, Maria, and their six children made the journey from nearby Thornton so that Patrick could take up his new position as Perpetual Curate… Continue reading My Journey with Anne Brontë in Scarborough, Part 1: St. Mary’s Church and the Woodend Exhibition

Brontë, Heritage, Juvenilia, Literature

A Tiny Book, a Big Campaign, and an Even Bigger World.

The origins of the Brontë juvenilia are now legendary. In June 1826, Branwell Brontë was famously given a set of wooden toy soldiers by his father, Patrick. This seemingly unimportant event - a father gifting his son a set of toys to play with - has become monumental in the story of the Brontës. Patrick's gift… Continue reading A Tiny Book, a Big Campaign, and an Even Bigger World.

Brontë, Literature, photography, Uncategorized

Haworth and the Brontë Bell Chapel, Thornton

The small village of Haworth in West Yorkshire is famous for being the home of the Brontë family. It's a place I've loved to visit over the last few years, often accompanied by our lovely fluffy friend, Bob the bichon. Since Bob's passing in April, I hadn't felt able to return to Haworth because I… Continue reading Haworth and the Brontë Bell Chapel, Thornton

Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Uncategorized

Beautiful Brontë Books

Here's a post with few words and lots of photos of various Brontë books that I own or have come across in libraries over the past few years. I'm mainly steering clear of Brontë inspired fiction though as I blog about this quite a bit. Reader, do you own any of these editions?    … Continue reading Beautiful Brontë Books

Brontë, Uncategorized

Bob the Bichon and Patrick Brontë: In Sickness and In Health

Two hundred years ago in 1819, Patrick Brontë (1777-1861) was offered the perpetual curacy of St Michael and All Angels' Church in the village of Haworth, West Yorkshire. Patrick took up the position in April 1820 when he moved his young family to Haworth from nearby Thornton. However, by September 1821, his wife Maria was dead, and… Continue reading Bob the Bichon and Patrick Brontë: In Sickness and In Health

Brontë, Literature, Reviews

Without the Veil Between, Anne Brontë: A Fine and Subtle Spirit by DM Denton

Regular readers of Brontë Babe Blog will know by now how much I love not only the works of the Brontë siblings, but works inspired by them. In the past year I've discovered some truly wonderful Brontë inspired fiction including Lena Coakley's Worlds of Ink and Shadow; Juliet Bell's re-imagining of Wuthering Heights, The Heights, and, my… Continue reading Without the Veil Between, Anne Brontë: A Fine and Subtle Spirit by DM Denton

Brontë, Literature, photography

The Brontë Parsonage

The Brontë Parsonage Museum was originally known as Glebe House when it was built in 1778-9. It's very first occupant was the Reverend John Richardson who died in 1791. Following Richardson's death, James Charnock officially occupied the Parsonage until his own death in 1819, but it remains unclear just how much time he actually spent… Continue reading The Brontë Parsonage